Sunday, April 13, 2014
blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: This image of Saint Peter weeping after his denial of Jesus, “before the cock crows” (hence the rooster at left), was painted in 1675 by the little-known Florentine artist Agostino Melissi. In the seventeenth-century the writer Filippo Baldinucci described it as “one of the most beautiful works that ever came from [Melissi’s] brush,” but by the 1950s it was for sale in a Philadelphia gallery under a different artist’s name. Since 2006, it has been in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where I saw it on a recent trip.  
There are plenty of Italian paintings that illustrate emotion-filled narratives. I’ve seen almost none that are only about the emotion itself, with the narrative left to play second fiddle. It’s almost a study in human expression masquerading as a bible story.
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: This image of Saint Peter weeping after his denial of Jesus, “before the cock crows” (hence the rooster at left), was painted in 1675 by the little-known Florentine artist Agostino Melissi. In the seventeenth-century the writer Filippo Baldinucci described it as “one of the most beautiful works that ever came from [Melissi’s] brush,” but by the 1950s it was for sale in a Philadelphia gallery under a different artist’s name. Since 2006, it has been in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where I saw it on a recent trip. 

There are plenty of Italian paintings that illustrate emotion-filled narratives. I’ve seen almost none that are only about the emotion itself, with the narrative left to play second fiddle. It’s almost a study in human expression masquerading as a bible story.

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

marveloki:

You know those gifs you see of elephants painting and everyones like “oh wow that’s so amazing and intelligent I love elephants”?

If you really love those elephants, read this and stop reblogging those gifs.

Wow this is sad

chrispiascik:

This drawing is my 1600th daily… so really it shouldn’t be so sad.

Prints and more available at Society6! / Daily Drawing #1600. / 2014 Zine Subscriptions available!

This makes me smile.

chrispiascik:

This drawing is my 1600th daily… so really it shouldn’t be so sad.

Prints and more available at Society6! / Daily Drawing #1600. / 2014 Zine Subscriptions available!

This makes me smile.

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Where Did the Art Teachers Go?

paddyjohnson:

Where Did the Art Teachers Go?

Mayor Bloomberg and Schools Chancellor Klein unveiling ArtsCount in 2007 (Image courtesy of NYC.gov)

Mayor Bloomberg and Schools Chancellor Klein unveiling ArtsCount in 2007 (Image via: NYC.gov)

Twenty percent of New York public schools lack a certified arts teacher, according to a yesterday’s report on arts education from Scott Stringer. New York schools are required by law to offer arts instruction.

The report paints a picture of a quiet and systematic dismantling of arts education, under…

View On WordPress

This makes me sad

Monday, April 7, 2014

thekidshouldseethis:

This street vendor makes popcorn with an explosive, pressure-cooking, popcorn cannon contraption, a centuries-old method. The video was filmed in Zhengzhou, China, but we’ve watched videos of this in South Korea, too. And of course, Mythbusters has looked into it, video below. Boom!

Related watching: Click to Enlarge: Popcorn, more explosions, and more videos of street vendors, including how this intricately-drawn melted caramel/sugar dragon is made.

via Boing Boing.

you-cant-keep-the-clown-down:

bookoisseur:

o-youprettythings:

gingerish—gal:

Baby Elephants!

bb efalunts

Its like they jumped out of Disney movies

Ok, this is just perfection.

(Source: venera9)

Sunday, April 6, 2014
risapuno:

50 years of artists at The Aldrich! (at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum)

risapuno:

50 years of artists at The Aldrich! (at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum)

Friday, March 21, 2014
photojojo:

When it comes to photo apps for smartphones, VSCO Cam has emerged as the premier choice on both Android and iOS. 
Now the team behind the wildly successful app has announced a $100,000 scholarship fund open to all creatives. Check it out below!
VSCO Cam Announced $100,000 Scholarship
via The Fox is Black

photojojo:

When it comes to photo apps for smartphones, VSCO Cam has emerged as the premier choice on both Android and iOS. 

Now the team behind the wildly successful app has announced a $100,000 scholarship fund open to all creatives. Check it out below!

VSCO Cam Announced $100,000 Scholarship

via The Fox is Black

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

amburdoll:

canyoushipit:

darkxbunnyprincess:

This is one of my favorite childhood stories.

WHAT THE FUCK

I loved these books

(Source: sugarcoatedagony)

Saturday, March 15, 2014
Just finished a new bag! I’ll post the tutorial soon.

Just finished a new bag! I’ll post the tutorial soon.

Friday, March 14, 2014
It’s show change!  Here is a peak at one of the five historical works coming to The Aldrich next month. Highlighting the Museum’s past while creating a dialonge with it’s present. Four contemporary exhibitions also open this month I’ll post images of those soon as well.
Standing in the Shadows of Love: The Aldrich Collection 1964–1974Robert Indiana, Robert Morris, Ree Morton, Robert Rauschenberg, Robert Smithson
Through September 21, 2014
Standing in the Shadows of Love: The Aldrich Collection 1964–1974 is a two-part exhibition that examines Larry Aldrich’s legacy through the works of artists he championed early in their careers, a practice that continues to be honored in the mission of the Museum. Each of the exhibitions will present works by artists who had a significant presence in the Museum’s collection during its first decade, which coincided with one of the most defining periods in art of the twentieth century. The 1960s and early 1970s still reverberate in our culture fifty years later, as concerns that were news then, such as civil rights, women’s rights, the rise of media culture and “youth culture,” the inception of the environmental movement, and the questioning of America’s role as a world power, continue to be critical issues at the core of our social and political discourse. Although most periods of the past are being mined by contemporary artists, the 1960s are looked upon as a “hinge” between modernism and what came to be known as post-modernism, providing the seeds for a world-view that still defines many of our beliefs. The included works are either the actual pieces that were in the Museum’s early collection, or comparable examples of the artist’s work from the same period.
Above: Robert Smithson, Three Mirror Vortex, 1965Collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Larry Aldrich, 1981 (1981.501 a-e).

It’s show change!  Here is a peak at one of the five historical works coming to The Aldrich next month. Highlighting the Museum’s past while creating a dialonge with it’s present. Four contemporary exhibitions also open this month I’ll post images of those soon as well.

Standing in the Shadows of Love: The Aldrich Collection 1964–1974
Robert Indiana, Robert Morris, Ree Morton, Robert Rauschenberg, Robert Smithson

Through September 21, 2014

Standing in the Shadows of Love: The Aldrich Collection 1964–1974 is a two-part exhibition that examines Larry Aldrich’s legacy through the works of artists he championed early in their careers, a practice that continues to be honored in the mission of the Museum. Each of the exhibitions will present works by artists who had a significant presence in the Museum’s collection during its first decade, which coincided with one of the most defining periods in art of the twentieth century. The 1960s and early 1970s still reverberate in our culture fifty years later, as concerns that were news then, such as civil rights, women’s rights, the rise of media culture and “youth culture,” the inception of the environmental movement, and the questioning of America’s role as a world power, continue to be critical issues at the core of our social and political discourse. Although most periods of the past are being mined by contemporary artists, the 1960s are looked upon as a “hinge” between modernism and what came to be known as post-modernism, providing the seeds for a world-view that still defines many of our beliefs. The included works are either the actual pieces that were in the Museum’s early collection, or comparable examples of the artist’s work from the same period.

Above: Robert Smithson, Three Mirror Vortex, 1965
Collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. 
Gift of Larry Aldrich, 1981 (1981.501 a-e).

Thursday, March 13, 2014

[x] oh my god his delivery

I love him so much I can hear this just by reading it.

(Source: personifyingchaos)

Friday, March 7, 2014

mostlyitaly:

San Gimignano (Italy) by jenni.rose on Flickr.

One of my favorite places and home of the best gelato! 

Thursday, March 6, 2014
Atsushi KagaUsacchi tries Josef AlbersAcrylic on canvas102 x 102 cm2011Atsushi Kaga is a Mother’s Tankstation artist, now showing at The Armory, and his work is my new favorite thing. He approaches serious topics and themes with a sense of humor which makes them accessible and endearing. My favorite piece is titled A Magic Trick. It features his often present rabbit pulling a cat with an eye patch out of a top hat with the tag line “Simplicity works.” It’s a beautiful small work with a ton of truth, and it makes me smile. The above painting Usacchi tries Josef Albers is also super awesome and totally fit in the environment of The Armory. Check out his work, and if you have time visit the Mother’s Tankstation booth at The Armory open now to Sunday 12 noon to 7 pm.      
  

Atsushi Kaga
Usacchi tries Josef Albers
Acrylic on canvas
102 x 102 cm
2011

Atsushi Kaga is a Mother’s Tankstation artist, now showing at The Armory, and his work is my new favorite thing. He approaches serious topics and themes with a sense of humor which makes them accessible and endearing. My favorite piece is titled A Magic TrickIt features his often present rabbit pulling a cat with an eye patch out of a top hat with the tag line “Simplicity works.” It’s a beautiful small work with a ton of truth, and it makes me smile. The above painting Usacchi tries Josef Albers is also super awesome and totally fit in the environment of The Armory. Check out his work, and if you have time visit the Mother’s Tankstation booth at The Armory open now to Sunday 12 noon to 7 pm.      

  


Tuesday, March 4, 2014
New Jersey

New Jersey